Goodbye, Brand #Uganda, Not #SoUg nomore!

So, I part ways with #BrandUganda! There is no value or satisfaction in defending an indefensible, intolerant, denigrating establishment.
I have been a good self-driven ambassador for Uganda, from my Diaspora location. Regardless of the habitual condemnation of “Diaspora nationals,” [of any country] by “those who stayed behind”. I am part of the African Diaspora, or “The New African Diaspora, herein referring to those who can trace their specific origin to any of the 54 states/countries of present day continental Africa, but live [permanently] outside their countries of birth or ancestry. We are often reminded that, “we abandoned our countries of birth/ancestral for “a beautiful life” elsewhere,” and dismissed as culturally ‘corrupted’ by cultures in our new countries of residence, unrealistic, and not attuned to events as they unfold in our countries of origin. We are often told off, by “those who stayed behind,” to stop unnecessary and undesirable interference in the national affairs of our countries of origin, which we supposedly abandoned on relocating elsewhere.
Even African Americans are often accused by Africans [including those in the Diaspora], of trying to force an ancestral link to continental Africa, yet they have no deep knowledge about it and are incapable of tracing their origin to any specific country. Plenty of Africans insist that African Americans are “Black” not African; the latter denotes “authentic” connection to the continent, while the former distinctly emphasizes descendants of slaves in America!
The fact is geography does not determine belonging to a particular social group or political entity. African Americans are as connected to Africa, as “the new African Diaspora,” by virtue of their ancestry, and preferred identification with the same geographical space. In fact, many Diaspora nationals globally, have played an important role in the welfare of their countries of ancestry or origin.
African Americans were a formidable force in the struggle for the decolonization of Africa, lobbying their United States and other western government, and through fundraising and financial donations to continental anti-colonial struggles, scholarly activism, and solid partnerships with continental African leaders and regional organizations. African Americans funded and facilitated the training of notable African leaders and scholars within the United States, hosted conferences denouncing colonial aggression and oppression, and participated in the then, Organization of African Unity (OAU) activities that culminated into eventual decolonization.
Today, the New African Diaspora, is very active in the economic, social and political development and advancement of their home countries. Diaspora remittences to many African countries supersede foreign direct investment or foreign aid, contributing greatly to the national treasury. Diaspora Africans also transfer and transmit technologies and social experiences from countries of residence to home countries. Moreover, they maintain lasting connections through family and friends “left behind,” and keep abreast with news and developments in their countries of origin. In some countries, Diaspora Africans are able to vote in national elections through their embassies or foreign missions.
True, we the Diaspora nationals are the unsung ambassadors of our countries of origin within their new countries of residence. As students or residents in our little corners here in the United States, African immigrants bring a new face of their countries of origin, among an American population that has never traveled beyond their zip code. We help undo the popular untruths among Americans that Africa is a wild jungle of war-torn countries, with poverty stricken, HIV/AIDS infected people, and potty-bellied begging orphans. Instead, Americans gain exposure to “a different African” —educated intellectuals, with a good command of the English language, healthy, and from wealthy family backgrounds. Resultantly, we, the African Diaspora alter the images about Africa, attract curiosity and potential tourists to our countries in Africa, often more effectively than our foreign missions in the United States.
Indeed, I have played my part, on flying the beautiful flag of Africa, and Uganda —my country of birth. I have embraced the mission of “undoing popular negative imagery about Africa,” in every country I have traveled to or lived, outside Uganda, most especially here in the United States where I have lived for nearly two decades. I am a self-propelled Afro-optimist, speaking and sharing my “Africa the beautiful”. As a Ugandan, I always challenge those who still identify Uganda with Idi Amin, reminding them that he left umpteen years ago, before I had an idea of who he was! In response to those who attack Ugandans as anti-homosexuality, I provide evidence that gays in fact have a vibrant social life in Uganda of weddings, funerals, parties, nights out about town, an annual gay pride, and registered civil society organizations defending LGBTQ rights.
True, slums sit side by side with upscale residential neighborhoods in the country, corner shops with tall buildings and sparkly shopping malls, and luxury sports cars cruise the city roads and country highways. Still, there is so much to celebrate about Uganda, inter alia, voted “Best Tourist Destination,” by Lonely Planet, and the “Most Entrepreneurial Country,” by Approved Index.
Exactly why, I had no hesitation jumping onto a #BrandUganda campaign, by a group of tourism and corporate Ugandans, dedicated to marketing Uganda in-country and to the outside world. The hashtag #Ondaba went viral, t-shirts printed with #Ondaba, and selfies shared of Ugandans wearing the t-shirts. Another hostage #IAmSoUg, also went viral on twitter, posted by was used by any Ugandan engaged in ‘patriotic’ activities, like tourism in-country and abroad. The #BrandUganda group, took the campaign to Spain, as Uganda’s self-propelled ambassadors seeking to entice Spanish soccer players and politicians to add Uganda to their tourist and business destination. I cheered them on.
Now, I am done! After the sham elections of February 18, 2016, I do not want to put my energies and my name to a gangsta mafia that grants itself the privilege of ruling Ugandans with an iron fist! I am not going to sink my might into an entity, stolen from me. I am not going to smear a project with sweet perfumes, when it is stinking rotten.
To those who will ask me about Amin, HIV/AIDS and Ebola, I am no longer going to boast about the progress Uganda has made since the days of Idi Amin. Nor quickly remind them of the resilience, enterprising spirit and hospitality of Ugandans. I will not interest them in visiting Uganda, no more!
Not when my Uganda is stolen by a thieving political machinery, hanging onto power by any means brutal and corrupt! I shall no longer attract opportunities to Uganda, to be robbed by a blood-sucking dictator, killing Ugandans, for demanding change and a chance to participate freely in choosing their preferred political leaders. There are no more praises to sing about Uganda; I am no longer interested in any #BrandUganda initiatives. Plenty of those posturing as #SoUg are in fact fetching heft rewards from nurturing and maintaining a monster in power.
No longer will I say that the political evil is in the nation’s past, when the evil, abusive and monstrous government of Museveni torments my country and my peoples. I will let all who ask, about the tear gas and live bullets, sprayed, clobbering, humiliating and murdering political activists, peaceful demonstrators and active citizens. Simply because they “Say No” to corruption, demand accountability, show up to vote, or dare to match peacefully for justice and peace for all Ugandans.
Goodbye #BrandUganda. No more no more No More!